The Words Missing from a NYT Essay about Religious Liberty

The Words Missing from a NYT Essay about Religious Liberty
AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster

The headline is jolting. "Religious Crusaders at the Supreme Court's Gates." Thus starts Linda Greenhouse's analysis of the actual and potential religion cases before the Court during its October term. Her thesis is that the Court's relative restraint in its religion cases the previous term represented the justices' merely "biding their time." This term the gloves may come off. Now the Court may well "go further and adopt new rules for lowering the barrier between church and state across the board."

She focuses on an Institute for Justice case that the Court has accepted for review, Espinoza v. Montana Department of Revenue. It involves a Montana supreme-court-ordered termination of a state tax-credit scholarship program that "helped needy children attend the private school of their families' choice," including religious and nonreligious schools. The precise issue before the Court, in dry legalese, is this: whether the Montana court's decision "violates the religion clauses or the equal protection clause of the United States Constitution to invalidate a generally available and religiously neutral student-aid program simply because the program affords students the choice of attending religious schools."

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